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  • January 24

    This week my Office of Rate Intervention and I announced that we have successfully saved eastern Kentucky ratepayers $54 million in unlawful fuel costs charged by Kentucky Power Co., the result of our intervention in a utility case previously before the Kentucky Public Service Commission (PSC).

    In an order issued by the PSC, citing joint testimony from my office and the Kentucky Industrial Utility Customers, the Commission deemed the fuel costs unreasonable and directed Kentucky Power to refund ratepayers $13.2 million that it had already collected during the first four months of last year. The PSC also barred the company from collecting an estimated $41 million in additional fuel costs that was to be collected through the end of May 2015. Over the 17-month period, the average residential customer will save approximately $155.

    This is great news. As Attorney General, I am proud to serve as an advocate for Kentucky consumers, and at a time when every dollar saved can make a difference for so many Kentuckians, I’m pleased that we are keeping this money in the pockets of ratepayers in eastern Kentucky. Since 2008, my Office of Rate Intervention has intervened in rate cases and other utility matters resulting in more than $1.18 billion in savings for Kentucky ratepayers. You can read more about the PSC’s order here.

    Finally, our Commonwealth lost an incredible man this week in retired U.S. Senator Wendell Ford. He was my dear friend, and one of the largest influences on my professional life. Wendell Ford fought for Kentucky - its schools, its towns, its farmers, and its airports. But most of all, he fought for the people of the Commonwealth he loved so dearly. What a public servant. Elizabeth and I send our condolences to his wife, Jean, and their entire family.

  • January 16

    This week, investigators with my Cybercrimes Unit arrested two men in Kenton County for allegedly possessing child pornography. Since the creation of the Cybercrimes Unit in 2008, we’ve taken nearly 700,000 child pornographic images and videos off of the Internet. I know that our efforts are helping make the Internet a safer place for Kentucky kids, and I appreciate the work my Cybercrimes investigators do each day. You can read more about the arrests in our press release.

    On Monday, I’m looking forward to participating in the annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. motorcade and rally in Louisville. For more than four decades, these events have served as an important way for us to remember Dr. King and reflect on his legacy. Dr. King always stressed and believed in nonviolence, and his courage to take a stand and move this country forward is an inspiration. If you’re attending either of the events on Monday, please stop by and say hello.

    Finally, Louisville lost one of its champions this week in Metro Council President Jim King. Jim was a family friend, a businessman who cared deeply about his community and a dedicated public servant. I was shocked and saddened to learn of his passing. Elizabeth and I are keeping his wife and family in our thoughts and prayers.

  • January 9

    Heroin is killing Kentuckians. In 2013, 230 Kentuckians died from heroin overdoses, and health and law enforcement officials expect heroin overdose fatalities from 2014 may exceed that number. The time is now to confront the reality of a growing heroin epidemic in our state.

    This week I was proud to join Gov. Beshear and First Lady Beshear in announcing that heroin overdose reversal kits will be purchased for Kentucky hospitals with the highest rates of heroin overdose deaths. We’re using funds from the $32 million my office recovered in settlements with two pharmaceutical companies to buy approximately 2,000 Naloxone rescue kits for the University of Louisville Hospital, University of Kentucky Hospital, and the St. Elizabeth Hospital system in Northern Kentucky.

    This project will allow us to get this medicine into the hands and homes of the people who need it most -- heroin users and their families. These kits will help save lives and provide a second chance for people to seek treatment for their addictions.

    To read more about this project and learn how we’re using the settlement funds for additional substance abuse treatment programs and initiatives across the Commonwealth, click here.

    I want to also remind high school seniors who have been impacted by prescription drug abuse that the deadline to apply for our college scholarship program is now less than three weeks away. The Sarah Shay and Michael Donta Memorial Scholarships for Hope and Healing were created in 2013 to help those students who have excelled in their personal and academic lives despite seeing the devastating consequences of prescription drug abuse.

    The scholarships, which are $1,500 each, will help two seniors get a fresh start and a chance at completing their college education.

    Scholarship applications can be downloaded here. The deadline to apply is January 28.

  • 2015

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